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CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:15am EDT
and convinced they do well because they love us. thus was born in the book 50 things liberals love to hate. i hope you enjoy it. >> thanks for coming out tonight. my name is chris this is brian weir founders of the canada party. we wrote a book. i will go a quick introduction. we're here from vancouver and brian is a candidate to give the system speech. will read some chapters in may due q&a then you can make noise and by us beers. [laughter] we are from vancouver. we started to realize b-1 to to get into political humor with short films in comedy and journalism but we do have television and canada. so we were watching the conventions but over the past two years everyone announcing the candidacy for the presidency of the united states we have seen york can it is and frankly they scare the shipped out of us. so we were running candidate to be the president. not brian, the canadian government but the people we love our big brother. we are here to help. we did a campaign video in january. it went by role. with media tv it -- to be around the world so we took off with another couple of
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
much more complex than some of those little stories and anecdotes would lead us to believe. >> host: let's look forward. one thing that is very important about william rehnquist, he hired a man named john roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i w
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 1:00am EDT
 personally it was the end of us >> did you know that ed of time that there would be some actions? >> we didn't know what, but h essentially when we heard this and it wasn't just me, the sense was the message was your extended. >> was through the take for a. >> was the first day of the workweek. there were demonstrations already scheduled in tayler on. one of the demonstrations was from east to west, right in front of the embassy. one of the group's preplanned as we know stopped and shouted slogans. >> students, soldiers? >> students. these were mostly as i noticed engineering students, people from the university of the engineering school and the public technique and the area of the demonstration came over the wall. we were essentially defenseless there was a government in iran which had no power to defend  ere were some people at the embassy in police uniforms wh disappeared since the attack me. because of course it is the irony in government as it would be true in any country where th host government is responsible for th
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 3:00pm EDT
buildings and properties in the city which don't pay taxes but use our services and use our roads, put the stress or extra burden on property taxpayers. that is part of the burden they have to bear for being the capital city and some times what the state wants to do doesn't necessarily follow the typical ordnances most businesses and residents have to comply with. city ordinances don't necessarily apply to the state so it can be a fraction point but we try to work through those things and understand the benefits of being the capital city far away from the down side that we have to deal with but the biggest challenge is always jobs and that is true of any community. you have seen what we have to offer. it is a vibrant community and there's a lot going on and a brand-new hospital coming online and brand new courthouse that is a $15 million project and the commerce center down the road that is the major construction. we are going to have a big construction project on the interstate that will make traffic move better and commercial development going on in this city and in the census w
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 10:00pm EDT
will not give me presents. [laughter] who is here with us tonight? i am glad. [applause] i feel safer in a room with teachers. they are my heroes. especially in the elementary grades. i used to teach there it is the best thing to do but heche in life. mystery can end mischief with those point* sized people. if i decide to stop writing books i think it like to go back to first grade to do it all again. i became a teacher 1964. i never intended to become a teacher. i have grown up in a privileged family. my mother and father were very ambitious. i went to harvard. forgive me. [laughter] majored in shakespearean era poetry and metaphysical poetry and of wonderful poet and then i went to oxford and got bored they're actually. sell many of the harvard boy use talked as if they were british even those from idaho. [laughter] sounded like british lilt -- royalty. i moved to paris steadying at the theater some great authors it. i came back to the united states early 1964 to do to the at -- university for the academic career. my life was transformed forever that year when the rising tide with t
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 2:00am EDT
46 of us who worked at "newsweek" sued the magazine for gender discrimination and hiring and promotion. we were protesting a system in which virtually all of the riders were men and all of the women were researchers or fact checkers. it was a system that henry had devised when he created "time" magazine in 1929. he separated the editorial functions of the newsmagazine. and a newspaper report goes out, reports the star, comes back and writes the story and is responsible for the accuracy of the story. he separated those functions in which the reporters in the field reported a story, sent files to a writer in new york who wrote the story, and then the story was fact checked. and only women were hired as fact checkers, and all the reporters and writes women. so "newsweek" started in 1933 they simply copied the times format. if you apply to "newsweek" and wanted to be a writer you were simply told that women do not write at "newsweek." if you want to write go somewhere else. and, in fact, that's what a lot of women did. women who knew they wanted to be journalists or had been work
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 4:00pm EDT
. this has always been a major national book prize with a host of us any previous winners, including among so many others, links to use, zora neale hurston, and the reverend or the king junior. and now, thanks to the vision, committed in sheer energy of one person, we now have a hot website and live streaming video of our event, national press club in several supporting lectures and presentations. you all know that one person is the lifeblood of the anisfield-wolf book awards, my dear friend and comrade, mary louise hunt. give it up for mary louise. stand up, mary louise. [applause] our annual ceremony has become an event in cleveland social intellectual calendar and that takes an entire team of people to pull off, including ron of course, but also sandy shoals. cindy, please stand up in the six other team members who have worked for months to create this evening. give it up to cindy. [applause] as mary louise put it to me just yesterday, and i quote an e-mail, making sure it's going to be here, she e-mailed me three times and called me when i was on the plane. i mean, it was terribl
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 8:00pm EDT
covering several several panels from the event. checkbooktive.org for air times. please let us know about book fairs and festivals in your area. e-mail us atbooktv@c-span.org. .. and before we start, you have seen the commercials that go something like this when you pay to much for cable you throw things and many for things people think you have anger issues and when people think think you have anger issues your schedule clears up and when your schedule clears up you grow scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and when you start taking in stray animals you can't stop taking in stray animals. i have my own version of that. your doctor insists you have a check of benemann or doctor give you a check-up he insist you have a tetanus booster and you wake up the next day feeling you have been beaten by a guerilla with a baseball that. you wander out into the street and get hit a truck. don't get a check-up when you feel perfectly well. [laughter] if i seem to be heading that way, please stop me. so today's event. there has been a battle going on for sometime now in dueling bo
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00pm EDT
their promise to pay it back if we use the money for the purposes we borrowed it for the we will wisely administer it. be dead. and those issues are very tightly interwoven in this whole problem of the welfare state. but my friend will vogel, one of his solutions at least was to move towards means testing and more of it so that in a presumably rich country and one that is getting richer broadly speaking over time, individuals should be able to pay for more of their own benefits, i mean because society -- if you look out over the past 30 years at society it's a lot richer than it was. if you look over the past 100 years it's phenomenally more rich than it used to be. his ideas that you can shrink the welfare state by confining it more to the truly needy and freeing up other people to make their own arrangements. and i think that is not an unreasonable solution but i don't know if it's politically viable. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> booktv has over 150,000 twitter followers. follow booktv on twitter to get publishing news, scheduling updates author information and talk directly with au
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 3:15pm EDT
question as i sate -- as i sit down. tell us, seth, what was going on, and give us a sense of what this book is all about. >> thank you very much for that wonderful introduction. [applause] well, this book is a history of the '60s. it's a secret history, or i should say the history of the secret of the fbi's secret activities concerning the university of california during the cold war, and mostly during the '60s. and the book tells that story by examining the fbi's activities in regard to three main characters; mario savio, the leader of the free speech movement, clark kerr, the president of the united universf california who turned out to be in a great dispute with mario savio and other students, and then ronald reagan who was running for governor at this time and made campus protests a major issue in the his campaign -- in his campaign and who was at odds with both clark kerr and mario savio. and what you can see in the book is that behind the seens of many of these -- scenes of many of these well known events, the fbi was deeply involved with these people and with the university of c
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 10:00am EDT
even ipods, batteries, some of the things that they'd let us know that they needed, and we collected a few boxes and sent them to the troops. each year it's gotten bigger and bigger and bigger, and i think last year we sent over 300 boxes to the troops, and we collected a lot of money which, of course, if you come to the event and you haven't brought a set of batteries, you don't need to feel bad because we have, like, $25 bags, $50 bags, $100 bags, $40,000 bags if you want to bring that. and we'll fill them full of things that they need. so that's on november 8th starting at 6:00, and you'll see here who our speakers are, and they are equally spectacular. so i hope you'll come and bring whatever you can. bring that big check that we're talking about. one last thing that i'll say, and that is if you have a cell phone, this would be an appropriate time to turn that off so there are no interruptions, and we will have cards -- i don't know if we have them yet at the tables, but we'll have cards in the event that you have questions. and we'd appreciate it if you'd fill out those cards, and
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:15am EDT
missionaries and korean-americans who helped them in their flight to freedom. not those of us who work in the policy world in washington sometimes risk becoming capitulated to the natives that an offense our senses are dulled and they no longer recognize the human consequences of tyranny and various public policies. this book, "escape from north korea," is the perfect antidote to the phenomenon. melanie does announce a masterful job introducing us to some absolutely extraordinary individuals. kim jill young who is arrested three times before a family make such freedom all because he simply wants the freedom to pin the music his choice. she gives us the story of stephen can come along and a businessman who was working for wal-mart, attending an underground church in chin san, who happens across a couple of north korean refugees and gets so moved by their flight that he decides is a part-time activity to help the north korean refugees escape from china. he gets arrested for his activities. he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states in deciding to dedicate hi
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
exceptional and i that i will ask us present at 2002 it could connect the stories come from personalities together to weave together a book that could define this decade through leadership ones. so i called carol andersen. carol andersen wasserstein richard in a helicopter accident. i called her on the phone as i did all the mothers who go for the book who lost their sons and i said carol, i would like to type you about richard. >> are you selling t-shirts quite >> no, ma'am, i'm from the naval academy and i have an important project like to talk to you about. i don't want to cut to the naval academy. she was actually torn at the time. she was suffering about her son said she had reached out to buy the academy family and we can do better. i said ma'am, we're writing about to honor richard. our classmate. over a hundred books to make him 30 make third roommate to would like to hear your voice. do it for richard, do for those who served. a few weeks ago, after we sold out our first printing at the naval institute press, i received an e-mail from her. my name is carol andersen
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 5:45am EDT
more like a nelson or tom clan sei thriller than it does the work of non-fiction. she tell us an incredibly powerful story about the human right and human tragedy. the tragedy that is modern north korea. she tell us the story through the eyes of many of the participates in the drama. the refugee, one of whom joseph kim is here with us today. one of only about 175 north korea refugees that made it to the united states in safety. she tells the story through the eyes of the workers on the underground railroad largely people involved in christian relief organizations both here in the united states and in northeastern china who work and at great risk to their own lives trying to open up a channel for north creern refugees to escape. north korea, as you know, is probably the most repressive regime in the world at this stage. it is a place where millions of north korea citizens have literally been starved by an intelligencal government policy over the last ten to fifteen years. it's a place that houses and has housed for well over a decade of serious of -- concentration camps where poli
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:00pm EDT
getting rid of the elect grow cartilage in any way help us out? >> well, i personally would love to get rid of the electoral college. it would eliminate something like ohio been so central. when you are here in new york, no one cares how new york is, so they just don't care about us and our vote doesn't mean as much as a vote in ohio. it really doesn't. the attention on ohio is extraordinary when you go there. as to the first question, i think what is amazing is the amount of money. when you look at the supreme court decision on citizens united, as critics charge very and use the language butchered again and again in an orwellian way because the ruling was meant to give a voice to a deprived and people at the coat others. and the founders have no idea about writing up a niche markets in the airwaves in ohio about facebook and social media and the internet and so forth. >> in the newspapers about jackson. so it was smaller because we didn't have facebook. and it seems to me that it's been corrected almost from the beginning, or just bigger. >> there were horrible lies about abraham l
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 7:00pm EDT
suspicion. they were sleeping in my bedroom, using my little yellow basin that was just the right size for me. there had been a fat austrian later told us to walk around the ceiling. an american couple that my mother scandalized when she discovered they were not actually married. now, there was a south african miner. although he had he gave us an opal. my sister like this and treasured her opal stone. i cannot forgive him for the death of my kitten. it was the first day of the spring holiday. three weeks of no school. i woke early thrilled by the prospect of endless days to feel however i wish. i would read and i would explore. i pulled on my shorts, my t-shirt, my sandals. i went downstairs to the kitchen. my father was cooking while my mother slept in. he was wearing his dressing gown over his pajamas. he always cooked breakfast on saturday. i said dad, where's my comic? you always brought me a copy of smash before he drove home from work on saturdays and i would read it in the morning. in the back of the car. he said do you want toast? and i said not burnt. my father did not like toaste
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 10:00am EDT
something as when he would come to him he would buy a small dealer and maybe want to tell us about that a little bit. >> so come and he walked into his office this young guy about 31-years-old and his name was carried hellinger and he was sharp as attack. he knew everything about financial reporting and he had won these -- rahm these mutual funds and everyone of the bank was just sort of in all about his knowledge and he really became a protege. so when it was time for wu to pass the bank on to someone else it made sense that he passed on to carry it dillinger. at that time we should say wamu was still a very small regional bank. wu had done a wonderful job of growing it but is still only have about $9 billion in assets and nobody else outside of seattle had heard of it. >> at the same time, when most people think of the terrie kepplinger they came to know that's not the first thing we get to know. i was fascinated by the background that you painted. the last guy in the world that you would expect to be a stiff banker or risky banker. sestak absolutely not. he was a humble guy from
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:45pm EDT
defining difference between him and herbert hoover was that he was really going to use dhaka government to help people and get us out of the great depression. so, no pressure there. [laughter] i was nervous before, but then hearing that, whatever. that's a piece of cake. >> i get a lot of laughter. every time the title was mentioned, people chuckled, and chris matthews said today and he chuckled and said that is just a funny title even though he said it like nine times it's funny every time. that's okay. and i realized that there are three actual meanings to the title, and i am only getting to talk about one for the most part. the first is sort of the title itself. what's the matter with white people? as what's wrong with them, why are nine out of ten sell five in the five republican voters today white in the country that is 62% white? that's a question that i have been thinking about a lot. i've been writing for so long and back in the day this he is for a long time i've been struggling with exactly why that fdr coalition fell apart and looking at it through the lens of my working-clas
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 8:30pm EDT
this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> host: joining us here at george mason university is the professor with the recent book "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs transform the global economy." here's the cover the book. professor, what role does fear play in economic development? >> guest: well, that's a great question, and maybe i'll talk about what role does fear play in our conversations about development, conversation about our presence so when we talk about our reality and share our ideas in a marketplacek competing with other ideas, and we know three things about marketplaces for ideas. short term sells better than long term. fear sells better than hope. negative sells better than positive that is to say, and exaggerated sells better than moderated. we see a disproportioned number of short term narratives of negative e exaggerated stories essentially. short term, negative, exage -- exaggerated. we're cree chars that grew up in environments where we were always subject to threats. we're no longer in those environments. we're in a complex economy that's interdepen
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2012 1:15am EDT
per at the wasadem unable academy joining us is arrow coddle was also author of the book underdog makingthey of the modern marine corps. when was it established? >> 1775. of marines claim 10 november but that was just a date congress authorized the creation. they did not raise those for. battalions.?? those battalions never were but the first marine goes into uniform 28 november this still celebrated as their birthday. >> host: what was the purpose? >> originally to be the guard on ship to protect the officers from the crew. it was difficult to salishan up. they had to have people there to enforce. na their job was to be ship's guard and also snipers buthe they are a very small part of the navy. >> host: and the marine corps is completed the separate service? >> inside the navy but it was contentious. they've good claim they should follow the navy and ashore follow thearmy, d regulations of the army. they eventually 1832 they are a separate service inside the >> navy. >> host: how did the mission changed? of >> guest: dave remained ships guards to the 20thng as century but jack
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 10:00pm EDT
use the a lot of other material that was not just the tapes. there's a lot of other arian civile research that goes into this. i tried to balance them out a little bit, but the tapes, themselves, do offer things that you just can't get in other places. when a traditionally historians have to rely on, basically, in this period, two types of information. you get the written documents or you get the recollections in the form of oral history and things like that. the written documents are great for some things and not so good for others. what you end up happening is that they have to be written by someone. there's a filter right there. that person has considerations in their mind, and that is filtering it. the oral history and memories, we all know that memory's faulty. two people can be in the same room and remember things differently. the tapes, themselves, give us a remarkably unrehearsed, unscripted view of what was happening. what i tried to do is filter those in with all of these other sources. >> host: david, thank you very much. i urge everyone to read the book and, later, yo
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 1:30pm EDT
gone wrong in 1940, why did we use this campaign so disastrously so it wasn't about human rights or not document in the massacres, but in the context of trying to explain the defeat, the officers very often gave a lot of detail on what had actually happened in the combat right after these people were taken prisoner so those are the most important sources. the soldiers in the diaries admit that they did kill africans. very few of them, but what you can see in the german source mostly the stereotypes about men eating african soldiers that mirror almost 1-1 in the proceeding days. one of the things that surprised me is that the massacres were by no means universal. there were german officers who were exposed to the san nazi propaganda of those that ordered the massacres but decided this is not right. this is against the geneva convention, this is a legal even though the official nazi newspaper essentially legitimized the killing of the prisoners it's the wrong thing to do, and many officers decided not to do it. there were some german soldiers who stepped out and said stop this. we can
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:00pm EDT
meeting of events were based more on the emotional language used to describe them other than what had occurred. europeans declare their love of country grew out of a child like devotion where american and french son celebrity fought revolutions from brotherly love. americans emphasize their patriotism grew from another variety of affection, the romantic love of courting couples. consider those who raise their voices in chorus the love of country. the lyrics explained a soldier is a gentleman. he that won't stand to his post will never stand by his wife. since love and honor are the same. neither can exist alone but flourish side by side. fare well for a while. when we drive the british dogs, we will kiss it out with you. with the title of my talk love and honor that they are the same, men and women were told there is a fundamental connection between attachment and national loyalties. lovers made the best soldiers and vice versa. the war of 1812 love story is anwr stories were intertwined so much now seems humorous. but the link between the two were liberal as well as big british. that
CSPAN
Oct 28, 2012 7:00am EDT
. thank you for joining us on booktv. >> thank you for having me. >> sander and stuart taylor talk about affirmative action, oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas. they agreed with the initial goals of affirmative action. that now believe it hurts the minorities. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you very much. thank you for roger and cato for sponsoring this event, it is great to have such a great kickoff to the book which is being officially published today. i am going to start and talk a little bit about the central idea itself and some of what we found in the book. i will try to relate this more to what is happening tomorrow. i am particularly glad to be doing this at cato because it stood for a lot of values that are in the book. i first became aware of cato in the 1980s one of was mostly doing community organizing the in the evenings thinking about policy issues and whether i should leave graduate school and become a policy tight person. a big issue was social security reform and trying to analyze what was happening and came up with this idea that people were
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 1:15pm EDT
army uses this as an argument to radically reduce or perhaps even abolish the marine corps. the marines fight back and they? win. and as early? as 1947, they st? arguing that the good war was?? nuclear weapons was probably not ?ing to happen.???? they say, how are you going to? keep stability in the cold war periphery if all you have???? something is something that can? atomize people?????? no, you need forces that can do a wide range o?f things.???? humanitarian or they've come th? peacekeeping, disaster relief comic and a small stability??? operations.???????? they start arguing that some 47? by 56, the height of the cold?? war, they argue explicitly??? ?ward the soviet union will not happen. you need very? capable, nonnuclear forces that can arrive? immediately and do lot? of things. we are that jack of all trades? service.????? so by ?the late 40s, early? 50s, they are building what are called? the marine air grod task forces culture today called the amphibious force in readiness. today, at all times, there are several thousand marines f
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 12:45am EDT
through the dreamers, for us to give them that chance to pursue their dreams, and to also get back to society. because, they will pay everything back. the way i have been paying back, through my writing, through all the work that i do so i want to see that happen for them. >> we have been talking with reyna grande, "the distance between us" a memoir, a simon & schuster title and and you are watching booktv on c-span two. up next deanne stillman reports on the largest manhunt in cover history after -- this is just over an hour. [applause] >> that was a really nice introduction and i want to say a big thank you to debbie, debbie kross and trudy mills and you all have been such great supporters of my work and the literary community. it's really nice and also think you to c-span for continuing to support my work as well. i love booktv and in the program may teach at uc riverside in palm desert i recommend highly to my students that they watch the tv every weekend. also i would like to thank all of you for coming out tonight. it means a lot to me and it's a beautiful evening, a full moon e
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 8:00am EDT
everybody can hear me, but i'll scoot closer. thanks very much for having us out. we appreciate the book stall bringing us in. most people don't realize it's actually the last bookstore in the northern suburbs of chicago. that's actually joke. [laughter] but we're really happy to be here. this is, actually, our first signing event for this project, so it means a lot to have people out, and, um, to hear about the work. so, um, and thanks for the introduction, sarah -- >> she's left. >> in the back. by way of background, that's where this begins for us is john was more on the political side with the paper since the late '90s, i was on kind of a crime beat at first and then i moved to 26th street which is the criminal courthouse in chicago and from there to federal court. and our careers sort of merged, not surprisingly, around rod blagojevich sometime after '02, '03, in that range, and certainly by '05, '06. so the project was just sort of our attempt to preserve this story and kind of tell a piece of city history and try to, i don't know if we've cut through all the sensationalism --
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 2:00pm EDT
meaning of events were liable to be based more on the emotional language used to describe them. while the europeans continue to declare their love of country to father kings and whereas american and french sons of liberty had fought a revolution against monarchs from what they call motives of brotherly love. americans in 1812 emphasized that their patriotism grew from yet another variety of familiar affection. the romantic love between courting couples. consider for example the songsters. it's called the love of country that appeared in the publication called the national songbook in 1813. the lyrics explained a soldier is a gentleman. his honor is his life and he that will stand to his post will never stand by his wife. since love and honor are the same or are so near that neither can exist alone but flourish side by side. then pretty girls of do and when we drove the british blogs we will to set out with you. so, there you have the title of my talk with the promise that love and honor are the same. they were told there was a fundamental connection between romantic attachments and nation
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 11:00pm EDT
. after his useful journeys he never traveled to the south beyond kentucky. but then to serve one term united states house of representatives that was almost of a decade and a half they kept up with none of the men but they had no friends who could educate with southern politics. so lincoln's image of the slave south matched the abolitionists depiction to dominate society and politics agitating for secession with slave owners. lincoln appears to have no understanding or how deeply slavery is invented the with the overwhelmingly majority it seems linkdin thought of them with no attachment to slavery there were very much like abraham again. perhaps southern whites could not imagine a pro slave or against the yen. and actively supportive session but it springfield illinois he and his friend urged lincoln and with the republican triumph. there are no such men. with no firsthand knowledge of the south and no real friends to share acquaintances, lincoln unsurprisingly did not knowledge the distinction between those advocates and others said their politicians and had no relish just like jeffe
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 4:00am EDT
man to examine political power. he was such a genius in the use of it, to bend washington to his will, the political power produced in the second half of the 20th century is endlessly fascinating, to watch him use it, in this book i just published, "the passage of power," to see him step into the presidency where president kennedy was assassinated with no preparation at all after political scientists say the time between election day in november and inauguration day is 11 weeks they are saying that is too short a time for a president to get ready. linda and some had two hours and 6 minutes from which he was sworn in on the plane on air force one and let's get airborne and landed in washington. he had to get off the plane ready to be president of the united states. to see him step in with no preparation at all at a time when president kennedy's entire legislative program, civil-rights and everyone of his major -- was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress, to see him get that program up and running and has it, ramming it through. to watch lyndon johnson
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 1:15pm EDT
went on and on and on which is why i use somewhere in the book this image from an argentinean write where he talks about the pampas in argentina. he says you can't take a photograph of them. they look like a field. that's it. the only way you experience them is by traveling through them. and then they just go on and on and on and on and on and on, and they're always the same, and they go on and on, and they're always the same, and they go on and on and on, and they're always the same. >> uh-huh. >> and that's what it was like. it was like, it was like being in that situation of a situation that just endlessly went on. >> and during that time you could not live in your own home. >> that's right. >> you lived in the company of the police. >> yes. yeah, that was -- i mean, a lot of people thought that i was in sort of isolation somewhere, but actually it was the opposite of isolation. i was living with four enormous men with guns. [laughter] and who weren't close friends. [laughter] i mean, we became quite close. >> yeah. >> but it was, it was sometimes the problem was not isolation, b
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00pm EDT
-president you're in and says use your good offices with president jackson and tell them that he should pardon arthur. you know, his mother is very good. she says to you know the with the execution would be worse than the crime and that she could not contemplate that arthur would be executed. he and jackson are unmoved, and so the clock keeps ticking. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. you're watching book tv on c-span2. here is our prime-time lineup. up next, the rise of wish are all aside. at eight jussive proceed no. >> ellen book tv the rise of bashar al assad in it syria, the face that many in the weight -- west said that he would implement reforms and the syrian ruler is the group turned toward repression and violence. this is just under an hour. >> tonight we have a program with david lashed. a professor of middle eastern studies and history at the senate study of a texas. and david has been going to syria i believe 23 years. >> 1989. twenty-three years ago. >> started three years. some experience in that country. the reason i am excited to have and ta
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Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
tom's cabin because what we do, right and wrong, is what this novel is telling us to do. one thing that irritates people about uncle tom's cabin is how didactic it is. several times the narrator, still, appears in the novel and saying no reader what would you do in this situation? would you do the right thing or the wrong thing? that kind of moral order is what she is re-creating in uncle tom's cabin. she is really kind of writing a new bible, -- >> we are at number six -- 63 central street at the house of harriet beecher stowe where she lived and worked in 1850. it was also known as the house named after the original owner. she rented this house from him. he does live down the road over there and he did most of the repairs on the house when she lived here. she needed new sink and she needed a new stove or go the house when she moved in, she complained about the state of disrepair. it was drafty, cold but over time she managed to do some renovations herself and she wrote funny letters back to her friends and family about how hard it was to get people to help her with these repairs. she
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Oct 6, 2012 12:00pm EDT
key to a better life but i really think he fought all of us would just come back home and try to work from there. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> this is the first parish church. it is here in pew number 23 that harriet beecher stowe by her account saw a vision of uncle tom being whipped to death. .. >> for the next 90 minutes, we will explore the literary culture of this area in the special collections of this state and the country as well. >> this is the first parish church and it is significant to the story of "uncle tom's cabin." in many ways, harriet beecher stowe, by her account and fugue number 23, had a vision of uncle tom being put to death. uncle tom, as you know, is the hero of her 1852 novel, "uncle tom's cabin." the story of "uncle tom's cabin" is that he was a very good slave who is under an unruly owner that is so irritated by him and his goodness that he whips him to death. this is a scene in which the entire novel grows. harriet beecher stowe came from a very religious family who are located in ohio, where she grew up. they were
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2012 6:00am EDT
wooden table underneath one of those swinging bare lightbulbs. and fortunately for us she talked him out of it. he went on to create an american architect, lawyer for the little guy, advocate for the common folk. poking his thumbs, regarding the jury from beneath that cascading shock of hair, speaking with plain but emotional conviction of the nobility of man, the frailty of mankind and the threat to liberty posed by narrowminded men of wealth and their legal guns for hire, and his words, i believe, resonate especially today. .. politicians, newspaper men in the hallways outside jammed with spectators trying to get in. at times in his career, thousands of people what's around the courthouse on the outside listening, hoping to catch a glimpse of the words coming through the windows as the closed for the defense. now, in his lectures and public speaking, which he did a lot of, he affected a humble awkwardness a court is simplicity to endear him to his audience. you get stuck with his arms folded tapping his gold spectacles on his shoulder, his brow contracted in thought. of did he
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Oct 21, 2012 5:00pm EDT
and live a life like fax. the topic will remind us we have a presidential campaign going on in which there is a human cry about what is truth and what is fact and what is a fly and the rhetorical exaggeration there was a time in history when there were really great flyers. remember goldwater talking about nixon i can't tell you what he said about richard nixon because this is a family library and the family television tonight. but there was a time. just very briefly and clinton as a family with a certain kind of character here on page 150 assembling about the draft one subject only and the identity sometimes he outright lie. more often he shaded the truth ceasing to feel entitled to constructive events in ways that work to his own benefits. i happen to be at yale in the number of graduate when they were in law school together and the one wonders about the attraction and then one reads the second which is about tenet start interviewing hillary clinton. i could tell you a story who i had dinner with at precisely this time but this would go on too long. in the end he determined that he
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00am EDT
out. public. ♪ and w for those of us who had safety. people vote mostly democratic. do have a ways that we could help out? >> obviously not everyone is excited to go downtown to polling places on election day become especially since he made his some dirty looks to my but there are other things you can do. you can help by with voter registration lists him sane exactly how many mistakes have been made it out today are. also a mess. marketers will now use voter registration lists. it will lose money. i think you can also help with absentee ballots could be. very sophisticated. a very close assembly election. you could vote per absentee. there will send an absentee ballot even if you're not say. you will always vote absentee. well, that list is public. in one very close to a legislative election when candid supporters were very clever. the listeners of p-vlic, so they went and get the list and discovered which belong to a certain local party. the only do this for that political party. they fill the new voter registration cards and sentiment to the office for the elections. the affirmat
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Oct 14, 2012 8:00pm EDT
, nine and a half going on ten. >> host: what can you tell us about coming to the united states? what was your trek? >> guest: well, i had been separated from my father for eight years so when he returned to mexico in 1985, we convinced him to bring us back here. he was not coming back to mexico, and we didn't want anymore time separated from him. my father didn't want to bring me because i was nine and a half, and he thought i couldn't make it across the border because we had to run across illegally. i begged him to bring me here, and we took a bus from mexico city. >> host: right on the border. >> guest: right, and it was a very long two day bus ride because i had rarely been in in kind of cars or public transportation, and i know i got car sick many, many times along the way, but when we got to the border, my father hired a smuggler to bring us across, and -- >> host: what do you remember about that experience >> guest: well, what i remember is how much walking there was, and i remember having a lot of guilt because my father was right. you know, i was too little to make that kind
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 8:00am EDT
us would meet at 6:30 p.m., what gandhi attempted to do in south africa and accomplished in india. a civil disobedience, we studied the great religion of the world, we studied for what dr. martin luther king, jr. was all about and we were ready and we would be standing and at the theater were going on a freedom ride and we would be beaten. but we didn't strike back as a way of living in a way of life that is better to love than to hate. we wanted to build a love of community and be reconciled so this book is also about reconciliation to give you one example. i first came to washington, d.c. the first, 1961 to go on something called the freedom ride. 13 of us, seven white and 14 african-american. we came here on may 1st and studied and participated in non-violent workshops and i will lover frigate on the night of may 3rd someplace in downtown rest pete -- washington we went into a restaurant and i had never been to a chinese restaurant or had a meal at a chinese restaurant. that night we had a wonderful meal. the food was good, and someone said you should eat well because this migh
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Oct 20, 2012 2:45pm EDT
president of the clear blue loose policy institute and i thank you for joining us and welcome you to our conservative woman's network. special thanks to the heritage foundation. we have been putting this on for years ended to a pleasure to work with a fine organization like the heritage foundation. i am happy to introduce today's speaker, kate obenshain. you have seen her on fox news where she is a passionate, articulate defender of conservative values and has one of the loose policy institute's most popular campus speakers for many years and she has been speaking and mentoring young women that we worked with for decades and helped me out so many times to help the institute, and i am grateful to you for that. she has also been in almost all of our great conservative women calendars. our 2013 calendar is out. we do it differently with not only beautiful women but beautiful scenes from march of 2013 and the quote on her age, courage is the ladder on which all other virtues mount. other great ladies have spoken about courage as well. we love having you in our calendar. kate today will be ta
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Oct 21, 2012 1:00pm EDT
credibility on these things. and that was so dramatic that we don't like people to lie to us. this is about as close as a presidential candidate obama, looking to let democrats come to say she lied to us. i think that undermines what is going on. who else is pushing it is important. if you have a candidate who is in sioux falls, south dakota and they've been on the campaign trail all day, they're exhausted. they've made 12 different stops and to be here in oklahoma city, we kind of pass that off and say doesn't make a great deal of difference who they are or what they think they are at the appointed time. >> host: gary hart. >> guest: okay, gary hart created the original set of challenging people in the media. i think most people in the media knew that he ran around a bit, but rather than just letting it go, we have to remember we are out of time with the media to look into that so carefully. there is a backstage area. one of the problems we have today's politicians have no backstage area. whatever they do, wherever it is as real as that. ballot to be covered. that wasn't the case in that t
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 7:00pm EDT
it is so important for us to get engaged in the battle. if we don't nobody else will and we were passionate about conservatism and we have a unique degree of passion because we are mom's so many of us even if you are not, you are passionate but we are passionate because we want to pack liberty on not only in attacked passed on to our children and children's children, so even if you embrace that more traditional role and are looking forward to that, please do not think that you can get out of activism and out of being involved. we need you in this battle from here on out. it's too important. what we are standing up for is too important. i want to think the clare boothe luce policy institute. one of my favorite things is to travel around the country talking on college campuses because college students are on the front lines of the battle and it is so important what you all do standing up for young conservatives and giving them the courage that they need. i did just write this new book that michele held up, the divider and chief the fraud is hope and change, and i did it because i w
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Sep 30, 2012 10:00pm EDT
the people who came before me who bought and gave us that right. i think we are losing sight of that right now. i have never been as afraid for our country as i am right now. i am very afraid for our country right now. we have to hold on to the greatness that we have. let me give you a little background here. you have to know when you are a winner. while that sounds like it's self-evident, it is not. when i was with "seal team six", i thought i was winning. you know, member of an elite counterterrorism unit, you are deployed all over the world working with the best people, and i thought i was winning because i was a member of this elite team. but i wasn't. i was in terrible husband and father and that is something that is cultivated in an early age. i had to serve one master and my master was the seal team. if you think you are winning, we can take this across the board. are we winning as a nation, are we winning as an individual, are you winning is a relationship. it is easy when you define what you want to accomplish. defined mission congressman and congressmen and then you can def
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 11:00pm EDT
things they let us know that we needed so we collected a few boxes and sent over to the troops. each year it's gotten bigger and bigger and bigger and i think last year we sent over 300 boxes to the troops and we collected a lot of money which if you come to the event and haven't brought a set of batteries, you don't need to feel bad because we have $25 bags, 50-dollar bags, 100-dollar bags, 40,000-dollar bad as if you want to bring that and we will fill them with things they need so that on november 8 starting at 6:00 and you will see from the speakers are and they are equally spectacular so i hope you will come and bring whatever you can, bring that big check that we are talking about. one last thing i will say if you have a cell phone this will be an appropriate time to turn that also there are no interruptions and we will have cards i don't know if we have them yet at the tables but we will have cards in the event that you have questions and if you would fill all those cards they will be collected and handed to me so we can just really couldn't get them not to sergeant meyer. i w
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Oct 28, 2012 6:45pm EDT
that we can find a way to be of service to the people around us. if you think about how you make those decisions, one of the things we do in the navy sales team is we have an analogy about making tough choices on the front line, and we talk about using a compass. if you take a compass and poupt -- point it in a particular direction, you can walk all day. might walk over mountains, a forest, a desert, and what happens is at the end of the day, you end up in one very particular place. we also know that if, at the beginning of that gurn noi, you make a decision that you're going to make a change of court, and you might make a change of course of one or two degrees in your life, but you decide to change the court at one or two degrees, you start to walk the new path, walk it over mountains, through a forest, walk it through a desert. what happens is at the end of the day that you end up in a completely different place, and we know for the young men and women who we're working with today and those who read "the warrior's heart" is that for them, they are in a place facing a front line, wher
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Oct 7, 2012 9:45am EDT
iran becoming nuclear more than us. the people in saudi arabia, and egypt, jordan, so for that matter i think we will have to take action. and if the u.s. would decide to sit idly by and watch and to pray in order to take action, israel will have to do it by itself. it will not be easy. it will be harder. to deal with retaliation not only from iran. they will be nation's flying in from iran, from lebanon, hezbollah will join. hamas in gaza will send hundreds of missiles. but if we have to choose today between the option of allowing iran to become nuclear, to the option of fighting ourselves, i think the is a clear message what we will do. and the question is if will do with the u.s. or without the u.s., we are asking today. one of the main points of my book, i know many people here are involved with the middle east is the issue of two-state solution. for the last 20 years we hear about two-state solution. you must finish the conflict, the resolution will be a palestinian state. and president obama adopted this approach and she's calling upon us, the israelis to build a palestinian sta
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Oct 20, 2012 11:00am EDT
also seth will be signing books when we are done. with that, start with a question. tell us what was going on and give us a sense of what this book is all about. >> thank you for the wonderful introduction. >> this is a book of the history of the 16s, a secret history, for the history of the secret of the fbi secret activities concerning the university of california during the cold war. mostly during the 16s. the book tells that story by examining the fbi's activities in regard to three main characters, mario savio, clark kerr who turned out to the in a great dispute with mario and other students, and ronald reagan, who was running for governor at this time and made campus protests a major issue in his campaign and who was at odds with clark kerr and mario savio. what you can see in the book is that behind the scenes of many of these well-known events, the fbi was deeply involved with these people and the university of california and was secretly tampering with history trying to influence public policy behind-the-scenes. >> why not give a little background. how did you start this? i
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Oct 6, 2012 8:45am EDT
joining us here. my name is richard fontaine the president for the center of new american security. it's a pleasure to welcome you to celebrate publication of the look of the revenge of geography with the map tells us about conflicts and the state. i've heard it said before that you honor agreed author not by reading his books but by buying them. you will be happy to know books can be sold after the conversation on the stage in this room. bob kaplan's work is well known to many in the audience he's been a fellow at cnas and a correspondent for atlantic for about a quarter of the century and is currently the chief geopolitical analyst. i became acquainted with his riding through the book arabist which is a group of westerners living and working in the middle east. since that book, the title of the work, the coming anarchy, imperial grounds have provoked intense debate in policy circles. the most recent book monsoon and the future of american power has become required reading by those that interest in the future of strategic competition. as i've gotten to know bob i've learned he's not only
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00am EDT
in the mid-19th century. >> it's well past the time when women used pseudonyms, published under male names. it was a greater success rate. >> i think that this is probably one of the most influential works of literary fiction in american history. as we talked about before, lincoln's famous statement about it but not just in 1852. the popularity as richard was saying was something that has, right to the present in the 1890s during the jim crow era. "uncle tom's cabin" again commit very important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to
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